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Why would God interpose and pause or remove a minster from ministry?  McCheyne in a letter to his congregation writes:

First, With respect to myself. It does not become me here to show what benefit it may be to me. Suffice it to say that it has been a precious opportunity in which to reflect on the sins and imperfections of my ministry among you. A calm hour with God is worth a whole lifetime with man. Let it be your prayer that I may come out like gold, that the tin may be taken away, and that I may come back to you, if that be the will of God, a better man, and a more devoted minister. I have much to learn, and these words of David have been often in my heart and on my lips, “I know that thy judgments are right, and that Thou in faithfulness hast afflicted me,” Ps. 119:75. Ministers are God’s tools for building up the gospel temple. Now you know well that every wise workman takes his tools away from the work from time to time, that they may be ground and sharpened; so does the only-wise Jehovah take his ministers oftentimes away into darkness and loneliness and trouble, that He may sharpen and prepare them for harder work in his service. Pray that it may be so with your own pastor.

Robert Murray McCheyne and Andrew A. Bonar, Memoir and Remains of the Rev. Robert Murray McCheyne (Edinburgh; London: Oliphant Anderson & Ferrier, 1894), 182.

Thus, he gives two primary reasons: First, for the good of the minister:

Suffice it to say that it has been a precious opportunity in which to reflect on the sins and imperfections of my ministry among you. A calm hour with God is worth a whole lifetime with man. Let it be your prayer that I may come out like gold

It must be noted plainly that the good is the removal of sin. We too easily fail to realize that the single greatest evil in our lives is not oppression, difficulty, illness or other painful event. Rather, the greatest evil – indeed the only thing which is truly evil through and through – is sin. Thus, he prays and seeks prayers that God may purge him of sin.

This leads to the second purpose of God in his life: to make him a more fit minister, by the removal of sin:

Ministers are God’s tools for building up the gospel temple. Now you know well that every wise workman takes his tools away from the work from time to time, that they may be ground and sharpened; so does the only-wise Jehovah take his ministers oftentimes away into darkness and loneliness and trouble, that He may sharpen and prepare them for harder work in his service. Pray that it may be so with your own pastor.

This is a courageous prayer, as anyone who has known the means by which God purges sin. And yet, our goal must be the purging of sin – that we may minister more truly and rightly before God and for his people.