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Upon seeing the runaway slave which he had been pursuing, go ahead to hide in the mill, said – when he caught him, “What better place could I have found you than here!”

In the same way, a wife who is in a rage and suing out a bill of divorce on account of jealousy for her husband, should say to herself, “What better place could that woman find me, than doing this and  burning against my husband and in a public war with him; leaving my own house and my very own  bedroom!”  

Greek Text and Notes: 

Section 41

ὁ τὸν δραπέτην ἰδὼν διὰ χρόνου καὶ διώκων, ὡς κατέφυγε φθάσας εἰς μυλῶνα, ‘ ποῦ δʼ ἂν’ ἔφη ‘ σὲ μᾶλλον εὑρεῖν ἐβουλήθην ἢ ἐνταῦθα;ʼ’ γυνὴ τοίνυν διὰ ζηλοτυπίαν ἀπόλειψιν γράφουσα καὶ χαλεπῶς ἔχουσα λεγέτω πρὸς ἑαυτὴν ‘ ποῦ δʼ ἂν ἡ ζηλοῦσὰ με μᾶλλον ἡσθείη θεασαμένη καὶ τί ποιοῦσαν ἢ λυπουμένην καὶ στασιάζουσαν πρὸς τὸν ἄνδρα καὶ τὸν οἶκον αὐτὸν καὶ τὸν θάλαμον προϊεμένην;’

 

ὁ τὸν δραπέτην ἰδὼν διὰ χρόνου καὶ διώκων

The one seeing his runaway slave and through time pursuing

The subject of the sentence, the slave master is characterized by this conduct in two substantive participles.

διὰ χρόνου: means through time. Babbitt translates it “after awhile”.

δρᾱπέτης, ου, Ion. δρηπέτης, εω, ὁ, (δι-δράσκω) a runaway, Lat. fugitivus, βασιλέος from the king, Hdt.:—a runaway slave, *Id.

2. as Adj., runaway, fugitive, δραπέτης κλῆρος a lot of fugitive kind, i.e. crumbling clod of earth, which could not be drawn out of the urn, Soph. Hence δραπετίδης

H.G. Liddell, A Lexicon: Abridged from Liddell and Scott’s Greek-English Lexicon (Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1996), 211.

 

ὡς κατέφυγε φθάσας εἰς μυλῶνα

as he fled, coming before him to the mill

The aorist participle, coming before, takes place prior to the finite verb, fled.

ποῦ δʼ ἂν’ ἔφη

Where then/at which time he said

σὲ μᾶλλον εὑρεῖν ἐβουλήθην ἢ ἐνταῦθα

you rather to find I would desire than this place

Where could I prefer to find you than here?

γυνὴ τοίνυν διὰ ζηλοτυπίαν ἀπόλειψιν γράφουσα

A wife, such a one, because of jealousy, to divorce she has written

A wife who has taken out a writ of divorce on account of jealousy.

καὶ χαλεπῶς ἔχουσα λεγέτω πρὸς ἑαυτὴν

And grievously having let her say to herself

She is extremely unhappy. Babbitt has “and is in a high dudgeon”.

‘ ποῦ δʼ ἂν ἡ ζηλοῦσὰ με μᾶλλον ἡσθείη θεασαμένη

Where than the one jealous of me [my rival] rather would she be pleased seeing me

Where would my rival be more pleased to see me?

καὶ τί ποιοῦσαν ἢ λυπουμένην

and what doing than suffering

καὶ στασιάζουσαν πρὸς τὸν ἄνδρ

and in rebellion against my husband

στασιάζω … to be factious and cause public discord, rebel πρός τινα against someone BDAG, 940. Not the usual word for a domestic quarrel.

καὶ τὸν οἶκον αὐτὸν καὶ τὸν θάλαμον προϊεμένην

and his house and my bedroom leaving

 

ΘΑΛ́ᾸΜΟΣ, ὁ, an inner room or chamber:

1. generally, the womens apartment, inner part of the house, Hom., Hdt.

2. a chamber in this part of the house:

a. a bed-room, Il.:—the bride-chamber, Ib., Soph., etc.

 

 

H.G. Liddell, A Lexicon: Abridged from Liddell and Scott’s Greek-English Lexicon (Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1996), 357.