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The previous post in this series may be found here: https://memoirandremains.wordpress.com/category/literature/lucian-of-samosata/

I also suppose those things they say about Hera, how she – without any man – being lifted by the wind gave birth to Hephaestus – who really didn’t have good luck, because he was just a blacksmith at the forge with bronze and fire and sparks going up all around him; oh, and he had bad feet. He was lame from the fall, when Zeus threw him out of heaven; and if the Lemnians had not done him good, carrying him and showing him hospitality, he would be dead to us (just like Astyanax being thrown down from the tower); and so Hephaestus survived.

But what about Prometheus: who doesn’t know what he suffered, just because he was a great philanthropist. And so Zeus dragged him out to Scythia and crucified him on the Caucusus, where an eagle stood watch, eating his liver every day.

Greek Text & Notes:

[6] ὅμοια δὲ τούτοις καὶ περὶ τῆς Ἥρας ᾄδουσιν, ἄνευ τῆς πρὸς τὸν ἄνδρα ὁμιλίας ὑπηνέμιον αὐτὴν παῖδα γεννῆσαι τὸν Ἥφαιστον, ουʼ μάλα εὐτυχῆ τοῦτον, ἀλλὰ βάναυσον καὶ χαλκέα καὶ πυρίτην, ἐν καπνῷ τὸ πᾶν βιοῦντα καὶ σπινθήρων ἀνάπλεων οἷα δὴ καμινευτήν, καὶ οὐδὲ ἄρτιον τὼ πόδε· χωλευθῆναι γὰρ αὐτὸν ἀπὸ τοῦ πτώματος, ὁπότε ἐρρίφη ὑπὸ τοῦ Διὸς ἐξ οὐρανοῦ, καὶ εἴ γε μὴ οἱ Λήμνιοι καλῶς ποιοῦντες ἔτι φερόμενον αὐτὸν ὑπεδέξαντο, κἂν ἐτεθνήκει ἡμῖν ὁ Ἥφαιστος ὥσπερ ὁ Ἀστυάναξ ἀπὸ τοῦ πύργου καταπεσών. Καίτοι τὰ μὲν Ἡφαίστου μέτρια· τὸν δὲ Προμηθέα τίς οὐκ οἶδεν οἷα ἔπαθεν, διότι καθʼ ὑπερβολὴν φιλάνθρωπος ἦν; καὶ γὰρ αὖ καὶ τοῦτον εἰς τὴν Σκυθίαν ἀγαγὼν ὁ Ζεὺς ἀνεσταύρωσεν ἐπὶ τοῦ Καυκάσου, τὸν ἀετὸν αὐτῷ παρακαταστήσας τὸ ἧπαρ ὁσημέραι κολάψοντα

 

ὅμοια δὲ τούτοις καὶ περὶ τῆς Ἥρας ᾄδουσιν,

I also suppose those things concern Hera they sing

 

ἄνευ τῆς πρὸς τὸν ἄνδρα ὁμιλίας

without the association of her husband/the man/any man

aneu: without

τῆς πρὸς τὸν ἄνδρα ὁμιλίας: Article matches the noun at the end of the phrase, the intervening prepositional phrase is adjectival:

Homlia: means either association or a conversation (homily).

The article here probably refers to the category of men, not a particular man.

 

 

ὑπηνέμιον αὐτὴν παῖδα γεννῆσαι τὸν Ἥφαιστον,

carried by wind she a child begot the one Hephaestus

 

ὑπ-ηνέμιος is either lifted/carried by the wind or metaphorically: idle

The article is the ironically famous Hephaestus.

 

ουʼ μάλα εὐτυχῆ τοῦτον,

not especially fortunate this one

 

ἀλλὰ βάναυσον καὶ χαλκέα καὶ πυρίτην,

rather an artisian and bronze and fire

An artisian who worked with bronze and fire

 

ἐν καπνῷ τὸ πᾶν βιοῦντα καὶ σπινθήρων ἀνάπλεων

by means of a furnace all his life and sparks going up

τὸ πᾶν βιοῦντα: substantive participle: the all living

σπινθ-ήρ , ῆρος, ὁ,

A.spark, Ar.Pl.1053, Arist.Ph. 205a12, Cael.276a4; of a meteor, “τοῦ δέ τε πολλοὶ ἀπὸ σπινθῆρες ἵενται” Il.4.77: metaph., “ἐμβαλὼν ς. Μεγαρικοῦ ψηφίσματος ἐξεφύσησεν πόλεμον” Ar.Pax 609; “ἐκ τούτου τοῦ ς. ἐξεκαύθη πόλεμος” Plb.18.39.2; “ὀφθαλμοὺς σπινθῆρας ἔχεις” AP12.196 (Strat.), cf. LXX Wi.11.18.

 

οἷα δὴ καμινευτήν,

thus this sort of blacksmith

κα^μι_ν-εύς , έως, ὁ,

A.furnace-worker, smith or potter, D.S.20.63.

 

καὶ οὐδὲ ἄρτιον τὼ πόδε·

and not the best foot

 

χωλευθῆναι γὰρ αὐτὸν ἀπὸ τοῦ πτώματος,

for to have been lame him from the fall

 

ptoma can be either a fall or a corpse (a body which falls)

 

ὁπότε ἐρρίφη ὑπὸ τοῦ Διὸς ἐξ οὐρανοῦ,

when he was hurled (rhipto) by Zeus from heaven

hypo + genitive: by the agency of

 

 

καὶ εἴ γε μὴ οἱ Λήμνιοι καλῶς ποιοῦντες

and if indeed not the Lemnians did well

Fowler has broke his fall

Homer, Iliad 1. 568 ff (trans. Lattimore)

“[Hephaistos addresses his mother Hera:] ‘There was a time once before now I was minded to help you, and he caught me by the foot and threw me from the magic threshold, and all day long I dropped helpless, and about sunset I landed in Lemnos, and there was not much life left in me. After that fall it was the Sintian men who took care of me.’”

http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/HephaistosMyths.html#Birth

 

ἔτι φερόμενον αὐτὸν ὑπεδέξαντο,

when they carried him receiving him

ὑποδέχομαι: to receive hospitabily

Tooke has take him up

 

κἂν ἐτεθνήκει ἡμῖν ὁ Ἥφαιστος

and if/otherwise he had died to us Hephaestus

 

ὥσπερ ὁ Ἀστυάναξ ἀπὸ τοῦ πύργου καταπεσών.

Just as Astyanax from the battlements being cast down

 

Astyanax, in Greek legend, prince who was the son of the Trojan prince Hector and his wife Andromache. Hector named him Scamandrius after the River Scamander, near Troy. The Trojans named him Astyanax (“Lord of the City”) as the son of Troy’s greatest warrior. In the sixth book of the Iliad, Homer relates that Astyanax disrupted the last meeting of his parents by crying at the sight of his father’s plumed helmet. After the fall of Troy, Astyanax was hurled from the battlements of the city by either Odysseus or the Greek warrior—and son of Achilles—Neoptolemus. His death is described in the last epics of the so-called epic cycle (a collection of post-Homeric Greek poetry), The Little Iliad and The Sack of Troy. The best-known extant description of the death of Astyanax is in Euripides’ tragedy Trojan Women (415 bc). In ancient art his death is often linked with the slaying of Troy’s King Priam by Neoptolemus. According to medieval legend, however, he survived the war, established the kingdom of Messina in Sicily, and founded the line that led to Charlemagne.

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/40140/Astyanax

 

Καίτοι τὰ μὲν Ἡφαίστου μέτρια·

And thus the moderation of Hephaestus

 

τὸν δὲ Προμηθέα τίς οὐκ οἶδεν οἷα ἔπαθεν,

But the Prometheus who does not know what he suffered

 

 

διότι καθʼ ὑπερβολὴν φιλάνθρωπος ἦν;

What an overwhelming philanthropist he was

 

καὶ γὰρ αὖ καὶ τοῦτον εἰς τὴν Σκυθίαν

and for when also this one to the Scythian

 

ἀγαγὼν ὁ Ζεὺς ἀνεσταύρωσεν ἐπὶ τοῦ Καυκάσου,

leading Zeus being crucified upon the Caucasus

 

 

τὸν ἀετὸν αὐτῷ παρακαταστήσας τὸ ἧπαρ ὁσημέραι κολάψοντα

the eale by him being stationed the liver (his liver) daily pecking

κολάπ-τω , of birds,

A.peck, κολάψασα ἐξέλεψεν τὸν νεοσσόν, of a hen, Hp.Nat.Puer.30; κ. τὰ ἕλκη, τὰ ὄμματα, Arist.HA609a35, b6; τὸ ἧπαρ, of the eagle and Prometheus, Luc.Sacr.6 codd.; τινα, of a crane, AP11.369 (Jul. Antec.): metaph., of a man, “ᾠὰ κ.” Anaxil.18.4; of rain-drops breaking up the soil, Thphr.Fr.30.2; of horses, strike with the hoof, App. Pun.129; of Pegasos, produce by striking the ground with his hoof, “κρήνην” AP15.25.19 (Besant.).

  1. carve, engrave, γράμμα εἰς αἴγειρον ib.9.341 (Glauc.); “τὸ δόγμα κολαφθὲν εἰς στάλαν” IG14.256 (Phintias), cf. 952 (Acragas), “Πολέμων” 1.30 (Demetrias), Luc.Dips.6, PLeid.X.36.