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iu-4

These are the apophthegms which bear his name:

The eldest of all being is God for God is not created.
The best, the Cosmos: for it is God’s workmanship.
The greatest,space: for it holds everything.
The fastest, mind: for it runs through everything.
The wisest, time: for it searches all.

Greek Text and Notes:

Φέρεται δὲ καὶ ἀποφθέγματα αὐτοῦ τάδε·
πρεσβύτατον τῶν ὄντων θεός· ἀγένητον γάρ.
κάλλιστον κόσμος· ποίημα γὰρ θεοῦ.
μέγιστον τόπος· ἅπαντα γὰρ χωρεῖ.
τάχιστον νοῦς· διὰ παντὸς γὰρ τρέχει.
ἰσχυρότατον ἀνάγκη· κρατεῖ γὰρ πάντων.
σοφώτατον χρόνος· ἀνευρίσκει γὰρ πάντα

Φέρεται δὲ καὶ ἀποφθέγματα αὐτοῦ τάδε·
These are the apophthegms which bear his name:
The basic meaning of the verb phero is to bear, carry. It can be used to designate authorship: “β. bear a name τὸ ὄνομα τοῦ κυρίου bear the name of the Lord, i.e. of a Christian Pol 6:3 (cp. Just., D. 35, 6).” (BDAG, 1051)

πρεσβύτατον τῶν ὄντων θεός· ἀγένητον γάρ.
The elders of all being is God, for he is without generation.
τῶν ὄντων: Of the things being. The plural would seem to imply “all”. A partitive genitive (to use Wallace’s categories): The thing which is part of the whole of all things being.
ἀγένητον: without generation, unborn, uncreated.

κάλλιστον κόσμος· ποίημα γὰρ θεοῦ.
The best is the Cosmos, for [it is] the workmanship of God.
Ephesians 2:10 (UBS4 w/Swanson)
10 αὐτοῦ γάρ ἐσμεν ποίημα, κτισθέντες ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ ἐπὶ ἔργοις ἀγαθοῖς οἷς προητοίμασεν ὁ θεός, ἵνα ἐν αὐτοῖς περιπατήσωμεν.
For we are his workmanship

Kosmos is the ordered universe, with emphasis upon ordered.

μέγιστον τόπος· ἅπαντα γὰρ χωρεῖ.
The greatest is space, for it hold everything
The greatest is place, space: where something could exist.

τάχιστον νοῦς· διὰ παντὸς γὰρ τρέχει.
The fastest is mind, for it runs through everything.
Dia marks extension: through.
Dia pantos when used of time means always. Here is easily means everything; but the idea of running strikes me as making more sense to be said to run through, not merely to

ἰσχυρότατον ἀνάγκη· κρατεῖ γὰρ πάντων.
The strongest is necessity, for it rules everything.
Concerning the related noun, kratos, the TDNT states:
1. κράτος, more closely related to → ἰσχύς than → δύναμις, and thus denoting the presence and significance of force or strength rather than its exercise, is found in various areas of Gk. literature from the time of Homer.1 Its first meaning is a. “might” or “strength” as a natural attribute, e.g., the physical strength which a man has, Hom. Il., 7, 142, or the toughness which constitutes the strength of iron, Od., 9, 393. A common expression is κατὰ κράτος, “powerfully,” “impressively,” “forcefully,” esp. with military verbs, e.g., αἱρεῖν κατὰ κράτος, “to take by storm,” Ditt. Or., 90, 26 (2nd cent. b.c.), P. Tebt., 27, 83 (2nd cent. b.c.), Ditt. Or., 654, 3 (1st cent. b.c.). We then find the sense b. of “power” which one has or attains, or with which one is invested; the power of the gods: τοῦ γὰρ κράτος ἐστὶ μέγιστον (of Zeus), Hom. Il., 2, 118, ἐλθέ μοι θεὰ θεῶν, κράτος ἔχουσα μέγιστον (invocation of Isis), P. Leid. U., col. 2a, 17 (2nd cent. b.c.); or the power which the gods have given to men, esp. rulers: ἀνθʼ ὧν δεδώκασιν αὐτῶι οἱ θεοὶ ὑγίειαν, νίκην, κράτος καὶ τἄλλʼ ἀγαθὰ πάντα, Rosetta stone, Ditt. Or., 90, 35 (2nd cent. b.c.), ὑγίειαν, [ν]ίκην, κράτος, σθένος, κυριείαν τῶν [ὑ]πὸ τὸν οὐρανὸν χώρω[ν], P. Leid. G., 14 (1st cent. b.c.), in the Egyptian royal style: ᾧ ὁ Ἥλιος ἔδωκεν τὸ κράτος, Mitteis-Wilcken, I, 109, 10 f. (3rd cent. b.c.). In this sense it is used esp. of political power: ἀρχὴ καὶ κράτος τυραννικόν, Soph. Oed. Col., 373, εἰς κράτος Ῥώμης, Ditt. Syll.3, 1125, 5 (1st cent. b.c.). It

Gerhard Kittel, Geoffrey W. Bromiley, and Gerhard Friedrich, eds., Theological Dictionary of the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1964–), 905.
σοφώτατον χρόνος· ἀνευρίσκει γὰρ πάντα
The wisest is time, for it searches-out everything/everywhere.